IB3413 International Trade Theory
Undergraduate course taught at the Department of International Trade and Business.

“This course aims to provide the students with a theoretical understanding of trade relations between countries, which will enable them to analyze trade-­‐related issues with greater depth and rigor. For this purpose the course will cover the development of international trade theory from Adam Smith and David Ricardo to the modern day in order to understand why nations trade, how they trade, how and why trade patterns shift, and what macroeconomic and microeconomic effects trade has on the economy of a country. Various theoretical approaches will be examined to that end and tested against empirical evidence. The course will also introduce the students to the fundamental economic factors that influence international trade, such as technology, institutions, natural resources, demographics and transportation.”

Syllabus

IB3414 International Trade Policy
Undergraduate course taught at the Department of International Trade and Business.

“This course aims to provide the students with an analytical perspective on trade policy, international trade relations and negotiations by referring to the linkages between trade policy and the political economy of international trade. The course starts with a discussion of the diverse range of trade policy instruments, and moves on the political economy of trade investigating the case of free trade versus protectionism. The linkage between trade policy and development will be examined, and the course will have an in-depth look at multilateral as well as regional efforts and mechanisms of trade liberalization. The rest of the course will discuss the links between trade policy and a number of issue areas, such as exchange rates, domestic institutions, environment and foreign policy.”

Syllabus

BA1011 Introduction to Business
Undergraduate course taught at the Department of International Trade and Business.

“The objective of this course is to develop an understanding of the roles, responsibilities, and skills required of individuals (managers and nonmanagers) in today’s changing organizations by analyzing the characteristics of successful managers and organizations. This process will also develop an awareness of the environmental conditions and pressures facing today’s managers and organizations. Specifically, students will become acquainted with the language of business management and the application of key concepts and theories to the “real world.” Some of the topics covered in this course include as follows: Management, the evolution of modern management thought, the environment of management, managing decision making and planning, managing organizational architecture, managing individuals and groups. Topics such as structure, communication, MIS/technologies, operations management, and innovation/entrepreneurship will be incorporated as appropriate throughout the semester.”

Syllabus