INTL451 Contemporary International Relations of the Asia-Pacific
Undergraduate course taught at the Department of Political Science and International Relations.

“The aim of this course is to introduce, discuss and analyze the contemporary international relations of the Asia-Pacific region, which—for the purposes of this course—includes Northeast Asia, Southeast Asia, South Asia and Oceania. The course is designed to provide the students with an theoretically informed overview of the nature of the international politics in the Asia-Pacific, changing patterns of power relations, ideational factors shaping the relationships, foreign and security policies of regional powers as well as sub-regional actors, and regional institution building. The course will start with an introduction to the region, followed by an inquiry into how mainstream International Relations theories view the Asia-Pacific region and discussion of how identity issues shaped by memory and historical grievances affect the peoples and the states of the region. After an overview of the development and the current state of the Asian power balance, the course will proceed to the individual actors, starting with the regional powers of China, Japan and India, followed by the sub regional actors like the Southeast Asian countries and Australia/Oceania, completing the picture with a discussion of the role of the external powers like the United States, EU, and Russia in Asian affairs. The course will place a special focus on the current hotspots in the international relations of the Asia Pacific, and conclude by discussing the prospects for establishing regional order and Asia’s contribution to global governance.”

Syllabus 

SOSC118 Encounters with Globalization
Core undergraduate course open to all departments.

“”The size and scope of global change since the end of the Cold War is striking. A new global society and a new global economy have emerged wherein more and more actors are increasingly interconnected and interdependent with each other through new forms of economic, political, cultural, and social ties. This new “global” world defined by social networks and individuals’ rapidly changing experiences of space and time, is, however, not the perfect place for us humans to live in. Despite all the benefits brought about by greater interconnectivity, globalization has its fault lines as well, including deepening and widening threats security, worsening inequalities, and increasing challenges against individual freedoms. How to benefit more from the opportunities provided by globalization, how to protect ourselves against the threats and how to deal with the negative aspects of the phenomenon will be some of the key issues faced the entire humanity for years to come. In order to guide the students through these key challenges, this course critically examines the subject of globalization from different angles—such as society, economy, technology, world order, security, regional dynamics, governance, inequalities and future perspectives—and aims to give the students grounding in the most fundamental aspects of globalization, by discussing key concepts and exploring selected substantive topics from the globalizing world of the 21st century we are living in.”

Syllabus

MGMT513 Foreign Policy Analysis for Business Leaders
Graduate course taught at the Executive MBA Program.

“Changing global context and its reflections in foreign policy strategies. Main factors determining Turkish foreign policy and what they mean for geo-political dynamics, as well as the possible threats and opportunities that they pose for the business world.”

Syllabus